THE ONLY WEB PORTRAYAL OF A NATION'S ENTIRE MUSICAL LIFE - DESCRIPTIONS, NUMBERS, ISSUES, FUTURES

Rainbow Serpent Festival - January 2013
By Asher Floyd (Creative Commons)


Credit: Simon Whitaker (Creative Commons)

ABOUT 'MUSIC IN AUSTRALIA'

The Music in Australia Knowledge Base provides the world with a source of information about musical practice in Australia and/or by Australians that can assist in its further development and lift its status in Australian life and culture, and in the world at large.

The Knowledge Base describes the situation of music in Australia. So, for instance, it could describe the situation of music in schools – what is provided, the competence of the teaching, government attitudes and so on, but would be much less likely to dwell on intricacies of pedagogy or syllabus.

It covers the entire music sector including the role of music in human development and society, music’s creation and practice, the music sector and its components, government policies, regulation, support, the international context. It covers facts, issues of contention, statistics, research.

The Music in Australia Knowledge Base is produced and published by the Music Trust. The Trust’s slogan: The Music Trust works with energy, imagination and authority for music in Australia.

New ADDITIONS TO MUSIC IN AUSTRALIA

INSIDE THE MUSICIAN. Aviva Endean: Thank you Peggy! The gift that keeps on giving.

Aviva Endean is an artist dedicated to fostering a deep engagement with sound and music, with the hope that attentive listening can connect people with each other and their environment. She works as a composer, clarinettist, improviser, and performance-maker, and creates unusual, spatially engaged, and participatory contexts for listening. She recounts her experience as artist in residency in the Peggy Glanville-Hicks House in 2021.

In education we are now measuring motivation rather than learning

The OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is seen as the gold standard for assessing the performance of education systems — but new research shows that its results are highly influenced by students’ lack of motivation to achieve high scores. The same may be true of Australian NAPLAN results.

The further hollowing out of ethics and education in Australia’s universities

By what calculus does the Australian government arrive at the decision to decimate (indeed, double-decimate) the academic population as an act of fiscal responsibility, and with it the educational future of the country, while engaging in a future submarine project which is a byword for unaccountable profligacy?

Loudmouth is the free monthly online magazine of the Music Trust. It reports current developments, discusses matters of policy, politics and cultural development. Its music education section covers issues ranging from early childhood to career development, community music and educational research. Its excellent reviews are written mostly by musicians, and include important recordings and books not reviewed elsewhere.

THIS MONTH ON LOUDMOUTH

MUSIC, THE ARTS AND THE WORLD

  • Understanding value of our cultural lives
  • Great opportunities: arts policy suggestions for the new government
  • How Gough Whitlam got the arts going
  • Australian government’s shrinking role in cultural diplomacy
  • 60 performances of Australian music at Albert Hall,London

MUSIC AND MUSIC PEOPLE

  • Chris Cody interviews the great jazz pianist Mike Nock
  • INSIDE THE MUSICIAN: self-revealing article by brilliant pianist Novak Manojlovic
  • Obituary: the late great trumpeter Bob Barnard

MUSIC, WELLBEING AND EDUCATION

  • Urgently rescue arts education now
  • Wales triples funding, launches National (school) Music Service
  • 60% of teachers exhausted, want out. To the rescue!
  • Reverse Morrison’s ignorant perverse university fee increase

MUSIC AND BOOK REVIEWS

THE BEST MUSIC REVIEWS page in Australia. Written mainly by musicians.

LOUDMOUTH’S JUNE REVIEWS

Reviews of 12 recordings in classical, jazz, experimental, new music, rock/pop. A book describing how Sydney developed its version of jazz and broke away from America. A review of the opera Voss, the greatest Australian opera to date, says the reviewer